Ep 631: Werner Herzog

Werner Herzog. Need we say more? Just that his latest film, a documentary is about his friend the late author —travel writer is too reductive— Bruce Chatwin. The film has an exclusive virtual run at our favorite NYC cinema, Film Forum. Visit filmforum.org for details about screening the great filmmaker’s latest work. The video version of this conversation is on Filmwax Radio’s YouTube channel.

Werner Herzog. Need we say more? Just that his latest film, a documentary is about his friend the late author —travel writer is too reductive— Bruce Chatwin. The film has an exclusive virtual run at our favorite NYC cinema, Film Forum. Visit filmforum.org for details about screening the great filmmaker’s latest work. The video version of this conversation is on Filmwax Radio’s YouTube channel.

The audio for this episode is available for Filmwax’s Patreon subscribers.

In his first appearance on the podcast, filmmaker Werner Herzog (“Fitzcaraldo”, “Grizzly Man”) discusses his latest documentary, “Nomad: In The Footsteps of Bruce Chatwin“. Described as ‘alarmingly handsome,’ Chatwin began work at Sotheby’s (he called it ‘smother boys’) dusting objects – and at age 26 became its youngest director. Then he quit – to study, travel, and write. His fictionalized biography of a 19th century Brazilian slave trader became the basis for Herzog’s “Cobra Verde”. With a writing style (The Songlines, In Patagonia, On the Black Hill) described by John Updike as ‘clipped, lapidary prose that compresses worlds into pages,’ Chatwin brought travel writing to imaginative new heights. And, like Herzog, he was known for embellishing facts to make them truer. “Nomad” is Herzog’s moving portrait of the man and the artist who didn’t tell ‘half-truths,’ but ‘truth and a half.’

Film Forum is pleased to present the exclusive NYC premiere this Wednesday, August 26th. Herzog says of Bruce Chatwin (1940-1989): ‘He was a writer like no other. We were kindred spirits.’ Two brilliant polymaths come together in Herzog’s fascinating appreciation of Chatwin, a man whose obsessions included walking, the ascetic lives of nomads (and its inverse: the OCD of collectors), pre-history, mythology, Aboriginal culture, art history, and archeology.

Join the discussion