Review: Drunk Stoned Brilliant Dead — The Story of the National Lampoon

Nat Lamp blog photoI remember the first time I encountered an issue of National Lampoon, sometime in the early 1970s in North Carolina, where I grew up. I noticed it in the news stand of a neighborhood drug store. Thumbing through it, I was amazed by the edgy cartoons and humor and in particular a racy story with a raunchy illustration. When I bought it, the uptight, middle-aged clerk gave it and me a scolding look. I feared, for a moment, that he would tell me it was for sale to adults only. Fortunately he didn’t and it became the newest element (Mad magazine preceding it, Monty Python and Creem magazine soon to follow) of my introduction to the hip, irreverent culture I was eager to be immersed in.

Drunk Stoned Brilliant Dead: The Story of the National Lampoon” (Magnolia Pictures, 2015) is a hilarious new documentary, directed by Douglas Tirola, about the ground-breaking, influential humor magazine published between 1970 and 1998. It’s named after Lampoon contributor Rick Meyerowitz’s 2010 book, a coffee table anthology of work from the publication, organized by contributer. The book is an excellent way to revisit some of the Lampoon’s best art and writing, but it doesn’t tell the complete history of the magazine. Read more