Rooftop & BAMcinemaFest Announce Summer Lineups

RooftopRooftop Films kicks off their 18th season next weekend at Industry City with back-to-back evenings showcasing the best of independent cinema. Friday, May 16th will pick up Rooftop’s long standing tradition of opening their season with a night of short films, an event they call “This is What We Mean by Short Films.”  On Saturday, May 17th, they will screen Gillian Robespierre’s very funny first feature “Obvious Child” which is already the buzz of the festival circuit and which will have its theatrical run later this summer. All said, 45 features will be screened in this summer’s festival at various outdoor locations. Here are some titles we are most anticipating: Read more

Review: THE DOUBLE

double poster“The Double” is set, much like Terry Gilliam’s “Brazil” or Godard’s “Alphaville”, in a fantasy world that is part future and part past. There are televisions, copy machines and elevators but the devices and sets are gray, cumbersome variants of their contemporary versions, inflected by the style and paranoia of Stalinist bureaucracy. Jesse Eisenberg plays Simon James, a shy, ineffectual clerk hopelessly in love with a blonde copy girl (a winning performance by Mia Wasikowska). A new employee, James Simon, turns out to be his doppelgänger. James looks just like Simon (though he has a hard time getting people to acknowledge this) but James is a confident, popular, swaggering cad who quickly wins over everyone he meets including the copy girl and the boss’s goth-punk daughter. The funniest scenes in the film involve James coaching Simon on how to get girls. This dual role performance by Eisenberg is a thrilling example of his acting skills. Simon’s frustration at his lookalike’s grand reception —cheerfully waved through by the same security guard who always challenges Simon’s credentials— keeps building as he is cuckolded by his bolder self.

The mentorship sours quickly, though, as James steals Simon’s research to get promoted and turns into a monstrous lothario  dragging countless women back to Simon’s apartment (including  a crabby, aging waitress, played by Cathy Moriarity. Based on a Dostoevsky novella and adapted by director Richard Ayoade (“Submarine”) and Avi Korine (Harmony’s brother), “The Double” is a hugely entertaining parable of paranoia and self-loathing, set in an allegorical world that anyone working in a cube farm today will relate to at once. Read more

Review: PALO ALTO

palo_alto-poster-new-palo-alto-new-movie-posterGia Coppola’s debut feature “Palo Alto” is based on four short stories by actor James Franco, who grew up in that Northern California city. The cultural and financial center of Silicon Valley, Palo Alto is home to mostly white, upper-middle-class, highly educated families. African-Americans make up less than two percent of the population; the only black person seen in the film is a cop.

Emma Roberts plays April, a shy high school student but who is years wiser —certainly nicer— than her peers. She is mockingly outed by her girlfriends as a virgin yet she’s secretly having sex with her soccer coach (Franco). Conflicted about this affair April also has a secret crush on Teddy. Teddy is a sweet, but petulant, non-communicative pothead played by Jack Kilmer, son of Val Kilmer. The senior Kilmer appears briefly in the latest of what is a series of odd but memorable performances. Teddy’s best friend Fred (Nat Wolff) is combative and  impulsive, putting both of them in bad, sometimes dangerous situations. Jack is not verbally sophisticated enough to keep Fred in check and both he and April are too socially insecure to advance their mutual attraction. Meanwhile, Emily (Zoe Levin), a girl with a bad reputation, easily seduces both Jack and Fred. Emily is sexually precocious yet still wears silly bandz (the ones pre-teens collect) on her wrist. The film is full of wonderful, subtle details like this. Even the privileged children of smart, liberal, resourceful parents must wrestle with the awkward transition toward adulthood. Read more